Contact

020 7377 9279
hi@thecubelondon.com

BRAINPLAY: HOW HAS TECHNOLOGY CHANGED THE WAY WE CREATE SELF IDENTITY?

18th October 2016 (7pm)

Since the formation of the UK Labour Party in 1900 people have changed dramatically. In 1900 the relationship between party and person was simpler, due to lower external forces influencing opinion and desires. However in 2016 we are vastly more complex individuals yet still have a similar political structure that encourages a form of identity and looks in reverse to cater to more complex identities.

Within this, our primary source of information is via technology.

Is it co-incidental that extreme behaviours are increasing in numbers as technology is all consuming?

With so much differing information how do we pick the right markers and bearers in society in which to base our identity. Are the multiple factors making us insecure and more susceptible to rhetorics that are easy to comprehend in a complex world (a la Trump style support)?

We are shaped by governments and thus politics. As we splinter and become more complex individuals how can we be represented by “unifying” forces?

In the UK, political parties which should be putting forth how a total UK would prosper under its guidance we actually experienced political forces battling to create the biggest split the country has seen spreading from the tips of Aberdeen to the base of Plymouth. Our political structure were not unifying forces, happily looking to set divisive agendas. Is this right, and should they (the parties) be so influential across the public, helped shape identity and opinion, not be guided better by certain codes of ethics and conducts?

Is traditional politics failing contemporary people?
Is technology exacerbating this?

Is there a newer solution to the above two points?

Join us for a very open roundtable discussion on identity, data, privacy, language, media, influence and government. The event will be led by the team at THECUBE but as a roundtable “brainplay” all guests contribute with equal measure, sharing their own ideas. There’s no definite result to the event other than to stimulate discussion on the topic.